Halloween can have mixed emotions for many children with costumes and decorations varying from playful to scary. As parents it can be difficult to help children understand that Halloween is all pretend. Knowing the facts can help you teach your children and make it fun.

Halloween evolved from the ancient Celtic holiday of Samhain, when people would light bonfires and wear costumes to ward off ghosts, but over the centuries Halloween transitioned to a day of parties, costumes,  and trick-or-treating.

The History Channel states, “Halloween, celebrated annually on October 31, is one of the world’s oldest holidays. Although it’s derived from ancient festivals and religious rituals,  Halloween is still widely celebrated today in a number of countries around the globe. In countries such as Ireland, Canada and the United States, traditions include costume parties, trick-or-treating, pranks and games. Versions of the holiday are celebrated elsewhere, too. In Mexico and other Latin American countries, Día de los Muertos—the Day of the Dead—honors deceased loved ones and ancestors. In England, Guy Fawkes Day, which falls on November 5, is commemorated with bonfires and fireworks.”

The National Safety Councils offers the following safety tips for Halloween:

  • All costumes, wigs and accessories should be fire-resistant
  • Avoid masks, which can obstruct vision
  • If children are allowed out after dark, fasten reflective tape to their costumes and bags, or give them glow sticks
  • When buying Halloween makeup, make sure it is nontoxic and always test it in a small area first
  • Remove all makeup before children go to bed to prevent skin and eye irritation
  • A responsible adult should accompany young children on the neighborhood rounds
  • If your older children are going alone, plan and review a route acceptable to you
  • Agree on a specific time children should return home
  • Teach your children never to enter a stranger’s home or car
  • Instruct children to travel only in familiar, well-lit areas and stick with their friends
  • Tell your children not to eat any treats until they return home
  • Children and adults are reminded to put electronic devices down, keep heads up and walk, don’t run, across the street
  • Watch for children walking on roadways, medians and curbs
  • Enter and exit driveways and alleys carefully
  • At twilight and later in the evening, watch for children in dark clothing
  • Discourage new, inexperienced drivers from driving on Halloween

TreeSchoolers Safety Song

Fun Fact

One quarter of all the candy sold annually in the U.S. is purchased for Halloween.

ASL Halloween Signs

Rachel teaches you the following:

  • Halloween
  • Pumpkin
  • Jack-O-Lantern
  • Ghost
  • Black Cat
  • Witch
  • Candy
  • Happy Halloween

ASL Halloween Signs Video

Pumpkin Patterns

Signing Time Pumpkin Patterns